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Springfield, MO

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Success by Design

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Designed by Jack D. Ball & Associates Architects LLP

This addition's primary feature is a 1,800-seat auditorium complete with balcony and 150-seat choir loft, according to J. Christopher Ball, associate AIA, who designed the project. The facility also encompasses full business offices, day care, education spaces and choir and orchestra practice facilities. After the completion of the project, the original auditorium (now used as educational space) will be converted into a wedding chapel and the current auditorium into a multipurpose space.

There were two main challenges in this project. First was coordinating and complementing the design of the large new auditorium with the smaller, more traditional gabled-roof structure that has been added onto several times. The shapes and forms were laid out to complement the existing structure and to allow the existing facility to be updated in time to more closely match colors and materials (i.e. to replace existing asphalt shingles with a standing-seam metal roof, etc.).

Another challenge was working within the constraints of a relatively small site, which can have a ripple effect throughout the project. Knowing this will most likely be the last building project on this site, you attempt to gain as much seating capacity as possible, while balancing it with parking and green space requirements. And the location of the existing facility did not lend itself to a large building addition on any side.

These requirements, along with setbacks and site circulation requirements, are what initially dictated the fan-shaped footprint. The individual relationships between different areas of the building then took over as the driving force of the organizational relationships.[[In-content Ad]]

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