Christine Daues is a familiar face to the Ozarks, as she has been delivering the evening news as an anchor/reporter at KSPR for three years.

Though this isn’t Daues’ first time on the Ozarks airwaves – she was a reporter and weekend morning cut-in anchor for KYTV from 1998 to 2003 – at KSPR, she shares the news desk with husband included Joe Daues.

Christine Daues’ off-air responsibilities news gathering for all the shows, writing news stories and Web content and managing the newsroom staff in the news director’s absence.

“I have assumed a much more direct leadership role in the daily news operations of KSPR,” she says. “I am the senior female in the newsroom, so I am called on to give direction on news writing, what stories we should cover and what treatment to give our content.”

Daues, a recipient of the Missouri Broadcasters Award for spot news coverage and an Edward R. Murrow National Award for contributing tornado coverage, also has been cast into the role of coach and mentor in the newsroom.

“This new generation of college graduates has such a different mindset,” she says. “They are motivated differently, have a different work ethic and respond to criticism differently (which has) forced me to learn to relate and adapt to a whole new generation of people.”

Still, she acknowledges that a successful newsroom requires a team effort, which is central to her own success.

Until about a year ago, Daues anchored the 4 p.m., 6 p.m. and 10. p.m. newscasts, but she gave up the late-night slot when her second child was born with physical disabilities.

It has been a long year for Daues and her family as they’ve made emotional and physical adjustments.

“My family is my most difficult challenge and my proudest accomplishment,” Daues says. “Finding the harmony between having a successful job and giving enough time to my husband and two young children is the hardest thing I have ever done. Achieving this balance has forced me to recuse myself from some of the more public aspects of my job.”

She makes the most of her time at work, finding creative ways to marry her professional responsibilities with her civic interests. Daues frequently volunteers – sometimes as a master of ceremonies – for groups such as The Ronald McDonald House, The Kitchen, St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital, Springfield Catholic Schools and Sertoma Club.

“I believe my job includes a responsibility to not just report the news, but also to positively affect the communities we cover,” she says.